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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
over the years, i spent most of my career in cia trying to forecast what people would do, and how things would turn out and when it comes to saying what is going to happen, we have every reason to be very modest about our abilities to do that. because the truth is, we can monitor weapons, we can monitor movements of military forces, but the decision to use them or how to use them is something that often is a mystery to us. and sometimes because the protagonist himself doesn't know walt he is going to do. so i have -- i became very cautious and, again, it may have been one of the reasons i decided to leave, i became very cautious about the use of military force, because the consequences are so unpredictable. maybe it will be a small reaction, but maybe not. and then you are back in another big war. we saw two swift, successful military missions for regime change in iraq and afghanistan. we all know what came after that. we took out qaddafi, the rebels in liberty i can't took out qaddafi with the help of western air support. things aren't looking that great in libya right now, so wi
points. officials tell the journal the cia made the call to remove the al qaeda references. why? to protect intelligence sources. according to the reporting of the journal, the fbi agreed with that decision but some state department officials said it made the talking points too vegas. now fox news has learned the director of national intelligence plans to give a classified briefing on benghazi tomorrow for the entire house of representatives. for the rest of the story, catherine herridge with us from washington now. catherine? >> shepard, tomorrow on capitol hill, a second round of closed classified briefings for all the members of the house of representatives, nation's top intelligence officer among others. lawmakers want more definitive information on the level of premeditation by the terrorists and how early it was known. >> the question is how much planning went into this? was it months in the works? was it cobbled together quickly within a matter of a few hours? it makes a great difference in terms of the responsibility as well as the vulnerability of our facilities elsewhe
of the homeland security committee and said that he wanted an investigation from the cia and the department of defense to find out whether you guys were given classified information in the researching for this movie. and a lot of people were very concerned about that. so let's ask. did you get classified information from the administration in preparing for this movie? >> no. i mean, we did a lot of homework as i hope is evidenced on the screen when you see the movie. and i hope people go see the movie and judge for themselves. but it's an election year and people say things in that process. and now that we have a movie that is actually going to be in theaters soon, i think people will see we didn't come with any agenda at all. >> i think one of the things they're going to be surprised at one of the center characters, perhaps the person most responsible for finding where he was hiding was a woman, the character you play, mya. what did you think of her? >> well, when i first read the script, i was shocked that a woman played a central role in it and then i was upset at myself that i was so sh
: a year ago, iran did manage to down a c.i.a. drone that apparently crossed the border from afghanistan. and last month, the u.s. military said another drone came under fire by iranver the persian gulf. it s undamaged. in afghanistan, a bomb blast has killed two nato troops in the country's south. the alliance says the attack happened yesterday. it did not provide the nationalities of those killed. so far this year at least 384 international troops have been killed in afghanistan. most of them have been americans. in economic news, the u.s. housing market showed more signs of recovery in a new report by the real estate data firm, core logic. it said home prices in october were up more than 6% compared with last year. that's the largest gain in more than six years. still, the housing news was not enough to boost wall stre's irits. stocks edged lower again as budget talks in washington showed no signs of progress. the dow jones industrial average lost more than 13 points to close at 12,951. the nasdaq fell five points to close at 2996. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back
in the world. our cia are out there all over the world but they have to get information. they collect it and analyze it. look at what happened in benghazi. that's another issue. we knew that it was a hot spot, but we didn't have intelligence that they were going to attack. >> greta: therein proves my point. that was another intelligence where we might have the hardest working people in the world, the best in the world but the fact is intelligence failures do happen with even the best. that's why it's very hard to have a lot of sort of comfort in terms of what happens with these, you know, chemical weapons should assad leave. >> no question. >> greta: mistakes happen. >> we can't be the sheriff for the whole world, so we have to work with other countries an other allies. as serious as the situation is in syria, we've got to work with russia. >> greta: let me ask you a quick question. you've actually met president assad. tell me your impression. >> on our way to iraq we had to go -- we were asked to go and stop by to see assad. this was right after, maybe six months after president obam
wire is a sports analyst. chad sweet is a former cia director of operations. and ken baer is a white housed a virus. todd carmichael is the host of dangerous grounds. howard kurtz will join us. and economic diane swonk rounds things out for us today. "starting point" begins right now. >>> good morning. welcome, everybody. let's begin with developing news this morning. a tsunami threat to tell you about was just lifted in japan. the country was rocked by a powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake. it hit off the coast of tokyo. the buildings there shaking. you could see some of the video showing the degree to which they were shaking. alex, what's the latest? >> reporter: it has been a very, very tense few hours here in japan after you mentioned a 7.3 magnitude earthquake striking late here in the day on friday. but just in the past 90 minutes or so, the all clear has been given. the tsunami warning has been lifted. that's great news for the people here. there's no signs of any significant damage. no reports of any deaths. just a few injuries at this point. we also have to keep in mind the nu
that mean jack the cia director has to go to the defense director and said this is where i want to spend my money? >> guest: the office of the director of national intelligence cents a thousand four is responsible for negotiating the relationship with the secretary of defense. it is a difficult relationship. the department of defense, and i have seen this process, always tempted to reach into the intelligence committee and say, another 2 billion over there. let me just breezy dow little bit because i need is for my program over here. director of national intelligence. it's. >> guest: we have added more layers. it's not clear. >> host: on twitter. he says remember all of this spending contributes to gdp. cut military spending in there will be a job loss economic slowdown. >> guest: certain job losses for sure, and every drawdown we have done has involved a decline in employment. the we in question is not bill clinton. bush and clinton. it started under bush. 300,000 civil servants. coming out of the civil service. people come out of employment in the economy as well. what you have to keep in
of the cia. cedrick layton member of the joipt staff. what are those consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> well, it is, look, the most recent information suggests they're preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem because now, a military strike could trigger the dissemination of such weapons. what you have to do now is is get the timely tactical intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. that is get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very ask, very difficult, but now, that's the position we're really in. >> just to be honest, hasn't really seemed to be at least totally aware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there was a wmd commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the committee. there are standards for assessing the credibility of sources. for how an analyst assesses a source and the information. and we know from the president's action against bin laden, he will ask the har
. is it too late? national security contributor fran townsend is a member of the cia and homeland security external advisory board and colonel cedric layton is a member of the staffs. what are the consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> it is. the most recent information suggests they're actually preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing sarin gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem, right? now a military strike could inadvertently trigger the dissemination of such weapons, what you have to do is get the intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very big ask from the intelligence community and very difficult. that's the positive we're really in. >> the intelligence community which to be honest hasn't really seemed to be at least, you know, totally aaware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there's been -- there was a commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the intelligence communit
. possibly for the pentagon or cia. we don't know how serious that is. so far, it's all the same circle. >> that's right. >> musical chairs. >> musical chairs. the knock a lot of people in washington give to the obama white house it is too insular and he doesn't pull the kinds of expertise he needs into this white house. there's an opportunity in this second term for him to shake things up a little bit. you know, maybe to bring in new players, new faces who have been there from the clinton white house, and kind of help the dynamic and help the governing because a lot of people on capitol hill even democrats will tell you, he's not good at governing and building coalitions. maybe if he brought some folks in who knew how to do that there would be more give and take on the fiscal cliff issue, on the tax reform and entitlement reforms that we get next year, and there is a sense he really could use a bit of some fresh blood to make things a little easier going forward. >> chris, susan, and ari, thank you very much for all joining us. and the jobs report, more jobs are added in november than
to bob's recent book that when the cia brought the idea of this -- these drones, and he was recorded to have said kill the seniors, you americans worry about collateral damage and don't worry about things like that. of this is the first time in our young history we allowed foreign power to kill our citizens, for free, for nothing. at the same time, there's amazing initiative that come into place since the government has taken power so in 2009, last summer, we had the prevention of electronic crimes act, which applies to anyone of any nationality across pakistan, and carries jail sentences so if you have an e-mail address not registered in your fall name, that's a jail sentence of six months. if you are found guilty of spoofing or character assassinating the president, that's three years to 13 years. what constitutes that? is it a blog post? that's unclear. you also have this incredibly inept and criminal way the government has handled the floods. while the floods raged, they embarked on a pr join to the cross, dubai, france, england -- went back home for a bit, back to russia, imposs
of the shoulder-fired missiles known as manpads which the cia were trying to track and contain in libya, may have migrated to syria, bringing down a syrian fighter jet and helicopter last week. then there are reports of chemical weapons, sarin gas being loaded into canisters for possible use. the u.s. set up a task force at a base north of ammon, jordan with 150 u.s. special forces working on a plan to secure assad's chemical weapons. >> the whole world is watching, the whole world is watching very closely and the president of the united states has made very clear there will be consequences, there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their own people. >> reporter: earlier this year the pentagon estimated it would take 75,000 ground troops to secure the tons of chemical weapons in assad's possession. that is it more than the number of u.s. troops in afghanistan right now. in the meantime, the administration's public statements appear designed to at least deter the assad regime from using them. next week in an international conference
up at trials in contrast agents agents for the cia and emi six. sometimes the public sometimes wonder how they have time during the week so they can provide services. of course no one believes that. no one. not a single iranian police these people who serve the revolution have completely become counterrevolutionaries. but the idea is to instigate and get into the hearts of the rainy process, telling them that somebody like mr. massari who researches in this server, if he is not safe, he has to tear up i'm sure fire. his cabinet ministers in the 1980s have short trials, but i is a simple iranian citizen -- [inaudible] this is the change. >> thanks. emmanuelle, i want to move on to you in light of what the difference blurriness felt during her period of imprisonment from the west or from the outside world and given ali idea is a novelty in washington. what does that say about the west is doing? pup measures to the western united states are taking specifically aimed at iran on its human rights record is supposed to proliferation? >> first of all, i want to thank the panelists and the aud
's keeping his own council abthat. he's alleges got the cia slot to fill as well. there are rumors there may be changes on his national security team. but nobody is being very specific about it at this point. >> shira, just the optics of the gop engaged in -- in a days-long filibuster with regards to susan rice, attacking susan rice for days. is that a fight that they want to pick? >> you'd think they wouldn't want to pick this fight, especially when there are other well-qualified people who want to be secretary of state such as john kerry, the senator of massachusetts, has made no secret at all that this is a position he's wanted far really long time. so you think this would not be a battle the white house would pick. but obviously the president has a lot of loyalty to susan rice. his defense of her a couple weeks ago from the podium was really unique and frankly defensive. so if this is who he wants, he has every right to nominate her and the senate has every right to say no. >> david, before i let you guys get out of here, i had katon dawson on a few minutes ago. saturdays we like to enga
to the cia and department of homeland security. general marks, let me start with you. what are the military options at this stage right now? realistically, what could the use, nato, the international community militarily do if there is an indication that the syrian military's about to use chemical weapons against its own people. >> wolf, that's the key point. in advance of its use what can the u.s. do? and it's clearly having a very robust, very broad intelligence collection apparatus that takes into account all means of collection, technical as well as human intelligence. there are known sites where the chemical weapons are stockpiled, where the production sites are. then there has to be an act to marry those up with the distribution or delivery means. >> a missile. >> a missile, artillery shell, put into a bomb then uploaded under the wings of an aircraft. all those are indicators of what might occur. intelligence has to be very, very robust in order to go after that. then, if it is such that we see that happening in a tactical sense, in other words, there's not much time to respond, we h
in the muslim countries and leadership changes in the arab spring countries. former cia specialist is joined by the washington journal's editorial page devotee and others, the foundation for the offensive democracy hosts this event. it's just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning, everyone. thank you for that introduction and thank you, all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be very lively debate. we are going to be asking the question of democracy is the triumph in the middle east islamic victory is unavoidable and essentials. this is the motion that we will be debating in the intelligence square format for the requests from ruel and brian. they have had a practice round. occurred on power. the revolution in egypt has taken many turns. the muslim brotherhood has come to power through the ballot box, but that has been marred of late thanks to mohamed morsi, the president of egypt earning him the moniker on atwitter of morsilini or mubarak with a beard, and now as we look around, we are not sure where this revolution is going and nor are we aware were the of the
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)